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Comments on LHAAP Sites and Cleanup by Technical Advisor George Rice

Below are documents created by a Technical Advisor, George Rice, whose work is supported by a Technical Assistance Grant from the EPA to Caddo Lake Institute. There are four general documents related to the former Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP) as well as documents related to specific sites within the LHAAP organized numerically by site. We will continue to add information to this page as it is created by Mr. Rice.

Quick links to documents authored by George Rice by site number: 3, 4, 16, 17, 29, 35B (37), 46, 47, 50, 58, 67, and 001-R and 003-R (MMRP sites)

 

SITE 3

LHAAP Site 3. Former Waste Collection Pad, Building 722-P Paint Shop.This was a waste collection site outside of the paint shop at Building 722-P within the boundary of the larger LHAAP-35A (58) site. Site-related chemicals remaining at LHAAP-3 are the metals arsenic and lead. Arsenic may be a potential source for groundwater contamination.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (May 2013)

SITE 4

LHAAP Site 4. This site was the Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant. It was not one of the originally listed NPL sites; however, it is being managed in the same manner because of the presence of contaminated groundwater at the site. It has now been added to the list of NPL sites. LHAAP-4 is approximately 0.5 acres and is located in the central portion of LHAAP in the northwest corner of 6th and 60th Streets near the former fire station. It is surrounded by light duty roads. The demolition of the facility's structures, tanks, and piping, and the disposal of the associated wastes were completed in the summer of 1997 as part of the RCRA closure of the plant.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (January 2013)

Presentation on LHAAP-4 by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (January 2013)

SITE 16 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 16 - Landfill. Landfill 16 (formally called the Old Landfill) was originally used for disposal of products generated from the TNT Wastewater Treatment Plant. However, a variety of waste was disposed of in the landfill until the 1980s. Waste may have included burned rocket motor casings, substandard TNT, barrels of chemicals, oil, paint, scrap iron, and wood. VOCs and metals above action levels have been found in the soil, surface water, and groundwater around the site. Low levels of explosive compounds were detected in groundwater.

Comments on Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (November 2010)

SITE 17 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 17 - No. 2 Flashing Area Burning Ground.  This site was used for burning bulk TNT, photoflash powder, and reject material from Universal Match Corporation’s production processes. The site was operated as a burning ground from 1959 until 1980. TNT has been detected in surface soils. This site is situated approximately 400-500 feet southwest of Burning Ground No. 3. Waste residues were removed in 1984 and the area grassed over. VOCs and explosive compounds were found in the groundwater. Explosive compounds were found in the soil.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (July 2010)

SITE 29 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 29 - Former TNT Production Area.  LHAAP-29 is a heavily wooded, 85-acre site in the western-central portion of the LHAAP installation. The site is bounded by Avenue E on the southwest, Zeugner Drive (also known as 1st Street) on the northwest, and 18th Street on the southeast. Avenue D serves as a portion of the northeastern boundary. LHAAP-29 includes the Former Bulk Toluene Storage Area, which is a wooded area that extends for approximately 500 feet northeast of Avenue D. The site once contained one standby and five regular TNT production lines. The area still contains the foundations of the former production facilities and the underground pipe lines that were originally built for cooling water drainage and TNT wastewater conveyance.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (April 2011)

Presentation on Site 29 by TAG Technical Advsior George Rice (April 2011)

DNT Fact Sheet by TAG Technical Advsior George Rice (September 2011)

 

 
SITE 35B (37)(NPL)

LHAAP Site 35B (37) - Quality Assurance Laboratory 29-A. This site served as a collection point for spent solvents from the Chemical Laboratory from 1985 to 1997. This site is within the LHAAP-35. The site held one 55-gallon, plastic, DOT-approved drum set on a concrete pad. Each full drum was sent to Building 31-W (Hazardous Waste Storage) for disposal.

Relevant documents:

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by Technical Advisor George Rice (April 2010)

SITE 46 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 46 - Plant 2/Pyrotechnic Operation. LHAAP-46, also known as the Plant 2 Area, is located in the north-central portion of LHAAP. Construction of facilities for producing JB-2 propellant fuel at Plant 2 began in 1944, but construction was halted in 1945 with the end of World War II. Plant 2 was used to produce pyrotechnic ammunition, such as photoflash bombs, simulators, hand signals, and tracers for 40 mm ammunition from 1952 to 1956. Plant 2 was reactivated to produce pyrotechnic and illuminating devices from 1964 to 1997.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (February 2010)

SITE 47

LHAAP Site 47 - Plant 3 Area. LHAAP-47 covers approximately 275 acres and is located in the north-central portion of LHAAP. Rocket motors were produced here from 1954 to the early 1980s. The rocket motor production facilities were converted to produce pyrotechnic and illumination devices; this operation continued until 1997. Industrial solid wastes and possibly hazardous wastes such as parts cleaners and spent solvents may have been generated by these activities.

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (January 2013)

Presentation on LHAAP-47 by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (January 2013)

SITE 50 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 50 - Former Waste Disposal Facility. This site received wastewater from several sumps at Plants 2 and 3 from 1955 to the early 1970s. Washout of ammonium perchlorate containers was performed on site. VOCs were detected in the soil samples. VOCs, metals, and perchlorate were detected in groundwater.

Comments on Final Propoed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (February 2010)

SITE 58 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 58 - Maintenance Complex. This site is a maintenance complex with concrete floors and no curbs at the doorways. Floor drains are connected to the sanitary sewer. Lubricants were stored on drum racks outside over a gravel surface. No curbing or other containment is present. Waste oil and solvents were transferred to Building 31-W. The site is being addressed under LHAAP-35.

Relevant documents:

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (February 2010)

SITE 67 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 67 - Above Ground Storage Tank. This site consists of seven above-ground storage tanks (ASTs) containing Number 2 fuel oil or kerosene. The ASTs have earthen dikes sufficient to contain potential spills. Motor fuel tanks were registered with the state and have been removed. There is no history of spills at this location. LHAAP-67 is being addressed under LHAAP-35.

Relevant documents:

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (April 2010)

001-R and 003-R (MMRP Sites)

LHAAP-001-R-01 (LHAAP-27) South Test Area/Bomb Test Area and LHAAP-003-R-01 (LHAAP-054) Ground Signal Test Area. LHAAP-001-R (aka LHAAP-027) is a 79 acre site in the south-central portion of the LHAAP. From 1954 until the early 1980s it was used to test photoflash bombs and demilitarize leaking, illuminating devices, leaking white phosphorous (WP) munitions, and, possibly, mines. LHAAP-003-R (aka LHAAP-054) is an 80 acre site in the southeastern portion of the LHAAP. Beginning in 1963, the site was used to test or destroy pyrotechnic munitions, rocket motors, button bombs and, perhaps, mines.

Relevant documents:

Comments on Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (July 2011)