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Documents for LHAAP Sites and Cleanup

Below are general documents related to the former Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP) as well as documents related to specific sites within the LHAAP organized numerically by site. We will continue to add information to this page as it becomes available. The Army maintains its own website for the LHAAP, which can be sen here.

Quick links to the sites below: 2, 3, 4, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18/24, 19, 29, 32, 35/36, 37, 46, 47, 49, 50, 56, 58, 65, 67, 69, Pistol Range, 001-R and 003-R (MMRP sites)

 

SITE 2 (non-NPL)

LHAAP Site 2 - Vacuum Truck Overnight Parking Lot. This site was used as overnight parking for a vacuum truck. Tanker trucks containing industrial wastewater were sometimes left at this location overnight. This parking lot is located next to Building 704D (inside the LHAAP-35 area) and use was discontinued in 1995. Record searches indicated no spills occurred at this site. This site was identified as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) in the RFA.

Relevant documents:

Final Decision Document by the U.S. Army (April 2010)

SITE 3 (NPL)

Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP Site 3. Former Waste Collection Pad, Building 722-P Paint Shop. This was a waste collection site outside of the paint shop at Building 722-P within the boundary of the larger LHAAP-35A(58) site. Site-related chemicals remaining at LHAAP-03 are the metals arsenic and lead. Arsenic may be a potential source for groundwater contamination.

Relevant documents:

Draft Final Proposed Plan by AECOM (May 2013)

Comments on the Final Proposed Plan by George Rice (May 2013)

Fact Sheet by AECOM (April 2013)

SITE 4 (NPL)
Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP Site 4. Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant. This site was not one of the originally listed NPL sites; however, it is being managed in the same manner because of the presence of contaminated groundwater at the site. It has now been added to the list of NPL sites. LHAAP-4 is approximately 0.5 acres and is located in the central portion of LHAAP in the northwest corner of 6th and 60th Streets near the former fire station. It is surrounded by light duty roads. The demolition of the facility's structures, tanks, and piping, and the disposal of the associated wastes were completed in the summer of 1997 as part of the RCRA closure of the plant.

Relevant documents:

Fact Sheet by AECOM (October 2012)

Final Feasibility Study by the US Army (August 2012)

Final Proposed Plan by the US Army (December 2012)

Comments on the Proposed Plan by George Rice (January 2013)

Presentation by George Rice on Sites 4 and 47 (January 2013)

SITE 13 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 13 - Suspected TNT Burial Site Between Active and Old Landfill. The Suspected TNT Burial Site/Acid Dump is an undocumented location where it is suspected that TNT or waste acids may have been disposed sometime during the history of the installation. Other than this suspected one-time disposal, no other activities have taken place at this site. Evidence of possible TNT burial or acid waste disposal at the site consisted of several areas of little or no vegetation that is consistent with the suspicion that some form of waste disposal has occurred at this location.

Relevant documents:

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (February 1996)

SITE 14 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 14 - Area 54W Burial Site. The Area 54 Burial Ground is an undocumented location where it was suspected that demolition debris, building rubble, explosives, and acidic wastes were disposed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The disposal site is reportedly beneath the asphalt parking area adjacent to Building 49-W. Other than this period of operation, no other waste disposal activities have taken place at the site. This site is included in the FFA. Completion of remedial investigation fieldwork conducted in 1993 concluded that no further investigation was needed at this site.

Relevant documents:

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (February 1996)

SITE 16 (NPL)
Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP Site 16 - Landfill. Landfill 16 (formally called the Old Landfill) was originally used for disposal of products generated from the TNT Wastewater Treatment Plant. However, a variety of waste was disposed of in the landfill until the 1980s. Waste may have included burned rocket motor casings, substandard TNT, barrels of chemicals, oil, paint, scrap iron, and wood. VOCs and metals above action levels have been found in the soil, surface water, and groundwater around the site. Low levels of explosive compounds were detected in groundwater.

Relevant documents:

Landfill Remedial Design (2017)

Final addendum to Final Feasability Study by the U.S. Army (March 2010)

Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (September 2010)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (November 2010)

SITE 17 (NPL)
Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP Site 17 - No. 2 Flashing Area Burning Ground.  This site was used for burning bulk TNT, photoflash powder, and reject material from Universal Match Corporation’s production processes. The site was operated as a burning ground from 1959 until 1980. TNT has been detected in surface soils. This site is situated approximately 400-500 feet southwest of Burning Ground No. 3. Waste residues were removed in 1984 and the area grassed over. VOCs and explosive compounds were found in the groundwater. Explosive compounds were found in the soil.

Relevant documents:

Final Feasability Study by the U.S. Army (April 2010)

Final Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (May 2010)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (July 2010)

Response to Public Comments (and Cover Letter) by the U.S. Army (July 2011)

SITE 18/24

LHAAP Site 18/24 - Burning Ground No. 3 and Unlined Evaporation Pond.  This site has two components - LHAAP-18, Burning Ground No. 3, and LHAAP-24, the Unlined Evaporation Pond (UEP). LHAAP-18 has been used since 1955 as a burial and burning ground for various industrial wastes generated at LHAAP. The former UEP was constructed in 1963 to collect water from the washout of rocket motor casings and process waste sumps. A groundwater extraction and treatment system was installed in 1997 to control the migration of contaminated groundwater caused by the UEP (closed down in 1986.)

Relevant documents:

Fact Sheet: Investigation and Risk Assessment Summary by the U.S. Army (March 2011)

Presentation on Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations by the U.S. Army (March 2011)

SITE 19 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 19 - Construction Materials Landfill.  This landfill was used sporadically from 1985 until 2009 and received non-friable asbestos and other demolition debris. It is located in the southeast portion of the LHAAP, just to the northwest of the Ground Signal Test Area.

Relevant documents:

Fact Sheet by AECOM (April 2013)

Presentation on No Further Action Decision Document for Site 19 by AECOM (April 2013)

SITE 27 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 27 - South Test Area/Bomb Test Area.  This site was constructed in 1954 for testing of photoflash bombs. During the late 1950s, iluminating signal devices were also demilitarized within pits at the site and until the early 1980s, photoflash cartridges were demilitarized in the area. In 1982, investigation included installation and sampling of two wells.

Relevant documents:

Well Construction Data and Comparison of 2009 and 2012 SWL by the EPA (October 2012)

SITE 29 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 29 - Former TNT Production Area.  LHAAP-29 is a heavily wooded, 85-acre site in the western-central portion of the LHAAP installation. The site is bounded by Avenue E on the southwest, Zeugner Drive (also known as 1st Street) on the northwest, and 18th Street on the southeast. Avenue D serves as a portion of the northeastern boundary. LHAAP-29 includes the Former Bulk Toluene Storage Area, which is a wooded area that extends for approximately 500 feet northeast of Avenue D. The site once contained one standby and five regular TNT production lines. The area still contains the foundations of the former production facilities and the underground pipe lines that were originally built for cooling water drainage and TNT wastewater conveyance.

Relevant documents:

Final Feasibility Study by the U.S. Army (April 2010)

Public Presentation on Proposed Plan by the US Army (March 2011)

Final Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (March 2011)

Site 29 Fact Sheet by the U.S. Army (March 2011)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (April 2011)

Presentation by TAG Technical Advsior George Rice (April 2011)

DNT Fact Sheet by TAG Technical Advsior George Rice (September 2011)

EPA Superfund Report article on developing a toxicity value for DNT (November 2011)

SITE 32 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 32 - Former TNT Waste Disposal Plant. The TNT Wastewater Treatment Plant was constructed in 1942 to treat and dispose of wastewater generated at the TNT Production Area (LHAAP-29). The plant was in operation from April 1943 until August 1945. In 1959, most of the facilities at the Wastewater Treatment Plant were removed. The suspected contaminants are explosive compounds and metals contained in explosive manufacturing residues. Surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment samples were collected in the area. Explosive compounds were detected in soils and sediments along with some elevated levels of metals. A surface water sample was collected in 1991, and the analyses detected low levels of explosive compounds. Groundwater has had no detects.

Relevant documents:

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (August 2008)

SITE 35/36 (Non-NPL)

LHAAP Site 35/36 - Sumps. LHAAP-35/36 consists of 125 process sumps and 20 waste rack sumps located at and near production or process areas within LHAAP.

Relevant documents:

Final Decision Document by the U.S. Army (December 2010)

SITE 37 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 35B (37) - Quality Assurance Laboratory 29-A. This site served as a collection point for spent solvents from the Chemical Laboratory from 1985 to 1997. This site is within the LHAAP-35. The site held one 55-gallon, plastic, DOT-approved drum set on a concrete pad. Each full drum was sent to Building 31-W (Hazardous Waste Storage) for disposal. This was the site of a Bioplug Demonstration. Final demonstration smapling was conducted in October 2014. Data indicated the Bioplug method was not particularly effective in reducing concentrations. The demonstration system was removed in January of 2015. Groundwater monitoring for the remecy specified in the ROD (monitored natural attenuation) will begin when the aquifer has returned to pre-demonstration conditions.

Relevant documents:

Final Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (June 2008)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor George Rice (April 2010)

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (June 2010)

Land Use Control Boundary by AECOM (February 2015)

SITE 46 (NPL)
Remedy: Monitored Natural Attenuation & Land Use Controls

LHAAP Site 46 - Plant 2/Pyrotechnic Operation. LHAAP-46, also known as the Plant 2 Area, is located in the north-central portion of LHAAP. Construction of facilities for producing JB-2 propellant fuel at Plant 2 began in 1944, but construction was halted in 1945 with the end of World War II. Plant 2 was used to produce pyrotechnic ammunition, such as photoflash bombs, simulators, hand signals, and tracers for 40 mm ammunition from 1952 to 1956. Plant 2 was reactivated to produce pyrotechnic and illuminating devices from 1964 to 1997.

Relevant documents:

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor, George Rice (February 2010)

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (September 2010)

Fact Sheet by AECOM (February 2015)

Land Use Control Boundary by AECOM (February 2015)

SITE 47 (NPL)
Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP Site 47 - Plant 3 Area. LHAAP-47 covers approximately 275 acres and is located in the north-central portion of LHAAP. Rocket motors were produced from 1954 to the early 1980s. The rocket motor production facilities were converted to produce pyrotechnic and illumination devices; this operation continued until 1997. Industrial solid wastes and possibly hazardous wastes such as parts cleaners and spent solvents may have been generated by these activities.

Relevant documents:

Proposed Soil Boring and Monitor Well Location in Shallow Groundwater Zone (2016)

Fact Sheet by AECOM (October 2012)

Fact Sheet: Invesitgation and Risk Assessment by the U.S. Army (March 2011)

Final Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (December 2012)

Comments on the Proposed Plan by George Rice (January 2013)

Presentation by George Rice on Sites 47 and 4 (January 2013)

SITE 49 (NPL)

LHAAP Site 49 - Former Acid Plant. LHAAP-49 covers approximately 30 acres in the west-central portion of LHAAP. It is the former Acid Storage Area, which was used from 1942 to 1945 for storage and formulation of acids and acid mixtures in support of trinitrotoluene (TNT) production during World War II. Nitric acid and sulfuric acid were manufactured and handled in large quantities in this area.

Relevant documents:

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (September 2010)

SITE 50 (NPL)
Remedy: Monitored Natural Attenuation & Land Use Controls

LHAAP Site 50 - Former Sump Water Tank. This site received wastewater from several sumps at Plants 2 and 3 from 1955 to the early 1970s. Washout of ammonium perchlorate containers was performed on site. VOCs were detected in the soil samples. VOCs, metals and perchlorate were detected in groundwater.

Relevant documents:

Final Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (January 2010)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor, George Rice (February 2010)

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (September 2010)

Fact Sheet by AECOM (February 2015)

SITEs 56, 65, 69 (NPL)

LHAAP Sites 56, 65, 69. LHAAP-56 - Vehicle Wash Rack and Oil/Water Separator Building; LHAAP-65 - Flammable Materials Storehouse; LHAAP-69 - Service Station Underground Storage Tanks. All three sites are located within the boundary of the 58 groundwater use restruction and non-residential use boundary.

The Vehicle Wash Rack and Oil/Water Separator Building was built in 1957 and was originally the location of vehicle wash-downs. It is located in the northwest portion of LHAAP in the Shop Area.

LHAAP-65 was originally used as a storehouse for flammable materials. It was built in 1982 and is also located in the Shops Area.

LHAAP-69 is located at the service station and was the site of six leaking gasoline undergound storage tanks. The tanks were leak tested in 1989.

Relevant documents:

Fact Sheet by AECOM (April 2013)

Presentation on No Further Action Decision Document for Sites 56, 65, 69 by AECOM (April 2013)

SITE 35A (58)
Remedy: Monitored Natural Attenuation & Land Use Controls

LHAAP Site 58 - Maintenance Complex. This site is a maintenance complex with concrete floors and no curbs at the doorways. Floor drains are connected to the sanitary sewer. Lubricants were stored on drum racks outside over a gravel surface. No curbing or other containment is present. Waste oil and solvents were transferred to Building 31-W. The site is being addressed under LHAAP-35.

Relevant documents:

Final Proposed Plan by U.S. Army (January 2010)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor, George Rice (February 2010)

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (September 2010) 

Fact Sheet by AECOM (February 2015)

Land Use Control Boundary by AECOM (February 2015)

SITE 67 (NPL)
Remedy: Monitored Natural Attenuation & Land Use Controls

LHAAP Site 67 - Above Ground Storage Tank. This site consists of seven above-ground storage tanks (ASTs) containing Number 2 fuel oil or kerosene. The ASTs have earthen dikes sufficient to contain potential spills. Motor fuel tanks were registered with the state and have been removed. There is no history of spills at this location. LHAAP-67 is being addressed under LHAAP-35.

Relevant documents:

Comments on Final Proposed Plan by TAG Technical Advisor, George Rice (April 2010)

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (June 2010)

Fact Sheet by AECOM (February 2015)

Land Use Control Boundary by AECOM (February 2015)

PISTOL RANGE (NPL)

LHAAP Pistol Range. The former Pistol Range is located in the southeastern portion of LHAAP, approximately 280 feet south of Avenue Q at the end of Robert Avenue. The site is the eastern portion of a rectangular field and is approximately 110 feet north to south by 150 feet east to west (approximately 0.4 acres). The former Pistol Range was known to have been used by LHAAP security personnel for small arms target qualification and recertification. The former Pistol Range was established in the 1950s and was used intermittently through 2004.

Relevant documents:

Final Record of Decision by the U.S. Army (September 2010) 

001-R and 003-R (MMRP Sites)
Action Work Plan On-hold Due to Dispute

LHAAP-001-R-01 (LHAAP-27) South Test Area/Bomb Test Area and LHAAP-003-R-01 (LHAAP-054) Ground Signal Test Area. LHAAP-001-R (aka LHAAP-027) is a 79 acre site in the south-central portion of the LHAAP. From 1954 until the early 1980s it was used to test photoflash bombs and demilitarize leaking, illuminating devices, leaking white phosphorous (WP) munitions, and, possibly, mines. LHAAP-003-R (aka LHAAP-054) is an 80 acre site in the southeastern portion of the LHAAP. Beginning in 1963, the site was used to test or destroy pyrotechnic munitions, rocket motors, button bombs and, perhaps, mines.

Relevant documents:

Proposed Plan by the U.S. Army (June 2011)

Munitions Constituents Data Summary Report by the U.S. Army (June 2011)

Public Presentation on 001-R and 003-R by the U.S. Army (July 2011)

Comments by TAG Technical Advisor, George Rice (July 2011)

Well Construction Data and Comparison of 2009 and 2012 SWL by the EPA (October 2012)